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2015 Summer Research School on Fluid Dynamics: Topics in Turbulence

Scientific Background

The turbulent motion of liquids and gases is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and engineering. Such fluid motion is fundamental to the formation of planets from interstellar clouds of particulates, to the dynamics of the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans that determine weather systems, to the mixing of reactants in combustion, to the dispersion of pollutants from smokestacks and storm sewers, and to the health risks caused by diseased arteries, to name but a few examples. Understanding and modeling the physics of turbulent motion is the basis of predicting its effects in these and numerous other examples and the basis for controlling it in engineering applications such as the design of air and surface vehicles, efficient engines for propulsion, heat exchangers and stents and heart valves.

Dates and Location

  • When: June 1 - 5, 2015
  • Where: Room 2121 J.M. Patterson Building (Arnold E. Seigel Learning Center), University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2431

Program for the 2015 Summer Research School on Fluid Dynamics

For more information, please read the official announcement.


Our Mission...

Inspired by the intellectual heritage of J. M. Burgers, the mission of the Burgers Program is to enhance the quality and international visibility of fluid dynamics research and educational programs at the University of Maryland with the help of an endowed Burgers Fund. Fluid dynamics in this context is viewed to include a broad range of dynamics, from nanoscales to geophysical scales, in simple and complex fluids.

Examples of Burgers Program Activities...

  1. Providing an environment and precedence for knowledge exchange and networking within the fluid dynamics community on the University of Maryland campus.
  2. Maintaining a close collaboration with the J. M. Burgers Centre in The Netherlands.
  3. Creating and building a Burgers Fund.

The Burgers Program is supported by faculty from the College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences and the A. J. Clark School of Engineering.